Episcopal News Service

Anglican women’s organizations not sufficiently valued, network says

[Anglican Communion News Service] The Steering Group of the International Anglican Women’s Network (IAWN) has said that in many parts of the Communion full value is not yet given to Anglican women’s organizations that contribute to God’s mission among marginalized women and girls.

In a communiqué issued after their UK meeting, Steering Group members reflected on the place of women in the Anglican Communion and concluded that more needed to be done to ensure the work and voices of women be acknowledged and appreciated.

Synod supports call to ‘re-evangelize’ England

[Church of England press release] The Church of England’s General Synod on Nov. 18 approved a motion, moved by Archbishop of York John Sentamu, to “re-evangelize” England, including the creation of a new Task Group.

Sentamu , introducing a debate on intentional evangelism, called on synod to put evangelism at the top of its agenda, saying: “Next to worship, witness is the primary and urgent task of the church.”

“Compared with evangelism everything else is like re-arranging furniture when the house is on fire,” he said.

El Salvador: Human rights, justice organizations weary in face of attack

[Episcopal News Service] In the aftermath of a Nov. 14 attack on a human rights organization that has worked to find children separated from their families during El Salvador’s 12-year civil war and the abrupt closure in October of the country’s largest war-crime records depository, organizations engaged in social justice and human rights fear a systematic campaign is underway to eliminate the historical record of human rights violations perpetrated during the war.

Myrlie Evers-Williams describes sense of civil rights movement’s future

[There is a video that cannot be displayed in this feed. Visit the blog entry to see the video.][Episcopal News Service – Jackson, Mississippi] Journalist Myrlie Evers-Williams, the widow of slain civil-rights leader Medgar Evers, describes the benefits of positive anger in bringing about change. She also discusses how young people need to be involved changing America’s future. Evers-Williams spoke during a Nov.

Isaiah Brokenleg speaks about how racism impacts Native Americans

[There is a video that cannot be displayed in this feed. Visit the blog entry to see the video.][Episcopal News Service – Jackson, Mississippi] Isaiah Brokenleg, program director/epidemiologist for the Great Lakes Inter-Tribal Council, talks about the invisibility of racism when Native Americans are involved. He spoke Nov.

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